Flowers as diverse as the couples

Wedding flowers range in styles, florists say, but the end result depends on personal preference and budget limits.

Lindsey Grannis, a wedding planner who owns One Fine Day in Steamboat Springs, said she sees floral budgets as tight as a couple hundred dollars as well as those that exceed $15,000. Grannis said she can work with all budgets.

"If they do not want to spend a lot on flowers, there is a lot I can do to just make it colorful, not huge," Grannis said.

Lori Romney, owner of Candlelight Floral in Craig, also can accommodate couples for about $150, but others have more money to spend.

"Some people don't care what it costs," Romney said. But for the others, "we try to count every penny and get them what they can get."

Prices often vary based not only on budget restrictions but also on priority lists, Grannis said. Some people think flowers are more important than others do.

Budget-conscious couples can use decorations such as candles to keep the price of decorations down, Grannis said.

"It helps with the budget. We can incorporate other stuff to fill in the table," she said. Plus, she said, outdoor weddings benefit from the natural, beautiful backdrop that the Steamboat area offers.

Grannis said she plans weddings during all times of the year. Recently, there have been a lot of winter weddings. Those weddings often use less fresh flowers and incorporate other decorations, such as artificial flowers and white trees.

But if you want fresh flowers for your winter wedding, there are options. Grannis sometimes orders flowers from New Zealand and Holland.

"You're not too restricted," she said.

Grannis recommends that people start planning floral arrangements six to eight months before the wedding.

Grannis said she limits the number of weddings she does, so "the sooner you book the better."

Some couples want only a bouquet and boutonnieres, Grannis said. She can help them two weeks before the wedding date, but she still encourages people to make their floral plans earlier.

Romney said many young brides come in six months ahead of time, but she doesn't think that is necessary.

"It's nice if we have a month ahead of time," she said.

Grannis said people have different levels of information when they show up for the initial meeting.

"Some know absolutely what they want," she said, and they already have decided the color, theme, number and types of arrangements, as well as the budget.

"Then I can say, 'We can make this work for your budget,'" Grannis said. "The more information they can come to me with, the better."

Other clients don't know what they want, but looking at Grannis' books and photographs usually helps guide the planning.

"I can get a feel of what they like," she said. "I can put a proposal together."

Grannis recommends bringing a friend or family member to help with the decoration decisions.

"It's good to have someone else to bounce ideas off of," she said. "Most people do."

Arrangement styles can range from tall, elegant vases to small, tight clusters of flowers.

"They're two completely different looks," Grannis said. "There is such a variety of what we can do with flowers."

Romney said options range from traditional rounded styles to wildflowers that look like they just got picked from the fields.

"We can basically do anything you want," Romney said. "Everybody wants something different."

Grannis said that budgets, colors and arrangement types depend on individual tastes.

"It's all personal preference," Grannis said.

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